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The Psychological Effects of Parental Alienation

For couples that don’t have children, a divorce could be the last time the pair ever see each other. For divorcing or separating parents, that might not always be the case. For many parents who decide to end their relationship, they may need to communicate with each other if they want to play a role in their child’s life. However, if there are residual feelings of animosity between the parents, its possible this may trickle down into how they each parent their children.

Marriage Contracts and Millennials

Marriages are often seen as one of those lifetime goals that people need to achieve, along with a post secondary education, having children and buying a house. However, sometimes the person you decide to be with early on in your adult life is not the same person you find yourself wanting to grow old with later in life.

Parenting After a Divorce

Once a divorce has been finalized, each party is able to move forward however they please. But when there are children involved, moving forward may not be as easy. Parents may need to speak to each other and consult with each other if they have agreed that their child will be able to live and spend time with each parent.

Separation And Divorce: Moving Out (Part 1)

Following the decision to separate or divorce, a lot of couples turn their focus to how they will part ways. In a perfect world, it would be an easy, mutually agreed upon decision. Unfortunately, few things in life go exactly according to plan, making it important to understand your options.

Why Couples Choose Mediation

In a world where ‘conscious uncoupling’ has become the benchmark of a good divorce, spouses are seeking strategies to navigate separation without resorting to acrimonious courtroom showdowns.

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